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Showing posts from July, 2017

The mysterious case of the changed last modified dates

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Today's blog post is effectively a mystery story. Like any good story it has a beginning (the problem is discovered, the digital archive is temporarily thrown into chaos), a middle (attempts are made to solve the mystery and make things better, several different avenues are explored) and an end (the digital preservation community come to my aid). This story has a happy ending (hooray) but also includes some food for thought (all the best stories do) and as always I'd be very pleased to hear what you think. The beginning I have probably mentioned before that I don't have a full digital archive in place just yet. While I work towards a bigger and better solution, I have a set of temporary procedures in place to ingest digital archives on to what is effectively a piece of locked down university filestore. The procedures and workflows are both 'better than nothing' and 'good enough' as a temporary measure and actually appear to take us pretty much up to Level 2

Preserving Google docs - decisions and a way forward

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Back in April  I blogged about some work I had been doing around finding a suitable export (and ultimately preservation) format for Google documents. This post has generated a lot of interest and I've had some great comments both on the post itself and via Twitter. I was also able to take advantage of a slot I had been given at last week's Jisc Research Data Network  event to introduce the issue to the audience (who had really come to hear me talk about something else but I don't think they minded). There were lots of questions and discussion at the end of this session, mostly focused on the Google Drive issue rather than the rest of the talk. I was really pleased to see that the topic had made people think. In a lightening talk later that day, William Kilbride, Executive Director of The Digital Preservation Coalition mused on the subject of " What is data? ". Google Drive was one of the examples he used, asking where does the data end and the software applicati

The UK Archivematica group goes to Scotland

Yesterday the UK Archivematica group met in Scotland for the first time. The meeting was hosted by the University of Edinburgh and as always it was great to be able to chat informally to other Archivematica users in the UK and find out what everyone is up to. The first thing to note was that since this group of Archivematica ‘explorers’ first met in 2015 real and tangible progress seems to have been made. This was encouraging to see. This is particularly the case at the University of Edinburgh. Kirsty Lee talked us through their Archivematica implementation (now in production) and the steps they are taking to ingest digital content. One of the most interesting bits of her presentation was a discussion about appraisal of digital material and how to manage this at scale using the available tools. When using Archivematica (or other digital preservation systems) it is necessary to carry out appraisal at an early stage before an Archival Information Package (AIP) is created and stored. It i