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Showing posts from February, 2015

Digital preservation hits the headlines

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It is not often that stories directly related to my profession make front page news, so it was with mixed feelings that I read following headline on the front of the Guardian this weekend: "Digital is decaying. The future may have to be print" While I agree with one of those statements, I strongly disagree with the other. Having worked in digital preservation for 12 years now, the idea of  a 'digital dark age' caused by obsolescence of the rapidly evolving hardware and software landscape is not a new one. Digital will decay if it is not properly looked after, and that is ultimately why there is a profession and practice that has built up in this area. I would however disagree with the idea that the future may have to be print. At the Borthwick Institute for Archives we are now encouraging depositors to give us their archives in their original form. If the files are born digital we would like to receive and archive the digital files. Printouts lack the richness, acces

When checksums don't match...

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No one really likes an error message but it is strangely satisfying when integrity checking of files within the digital archive throws up an issue. I know it shouldn't be, but having some confirmation that these basic administrative tasks that us digital archivists carry out are truly necessary and worthwhile is always encouraging. Furthermore, it is useful to have real life examples to hand when trying to make a business case for a level of archival storage that includes regular monitoring and comparison of checksums. We don't have a full blown digital archiving system yet at the University of York, but as a minimum, born digital content that comes into the archives is copied on to University filestore and checksums are created. A checksum is a string of characters that acts as a unique fingerprint of a digital object, if the digital object remains unchanged, a checksumming tool will come up with the same string of characters each time the algorithm is run. This allows us digi